Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11889/5265
Title: Effects of olive mill wastewater discharge on Alteereh membrane bioreactor (MBR) facility : challenges and solutions
Authors: Al-Sa'ed, Rashed
Keywords: Water quality management
Water - Purification - Membrane filtration
Water reuse
Sewage irrigation
Sustainable agriculture
Sewage - Purification - Technological innovations
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2016
Publisher: UPWSP, Palestine
Abstract: Unused reclaimed water is a wasted water resource. Currently, Palestine can show no single successful large-scale effluent reuse schemes in due to impaired effluent quality and socio-political issues. The membrane bioreactor (MBR), a novel modified activated sludge system (ASS) is a reliable and efficient technology that has become a feasible alternative to ASS for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment and reuse in Palestine. However, illicit industrial discharges of mineral and natural oils can initiate membrane fouling with consequent high operating costs. In this study, the performance of a full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR), serving 20000 capita in Alteereh suburb of Ramallah city, was studied. During emergency operation, the MBR treatment efficacy for the removal of biological oxygen demand (BOD), total suspended solids (TSS), and total nitrogen (Tot-N) from municipal wastewater was monitored and evaluated. Obtained results demonstrate a high quality of reclaimed water pertinent to COD, TSS, and tot-N concentration (10/10/10 mg/l, respectively) under variable operation conditions. Despite irregular and sudden industrial discharges, the MBR facility in Alteereh is a reliable and efficient technology for wastewater treatment and beneficial uses of reclaimed water in Palestine.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11889/5265
Appears in Collections:Institute of Environmental and Water Studies

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6.19 Al-Sa`ed (2016) Olive oil MWW MBR facility impacts discharges Jericho Conf 5-6 Dec 2016.pdfrefereed conference paper18.36 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


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