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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11889/2632
Title: Water Footprint of the Palestinians in the West Bank
Authors: Mimi, Ziad
Siebel, Maarten
Zaag, Pieter van der
Nazer, Dima
Gijzen, Huub
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Wiley InterScience
Abstract: Water in the West Bank of Palestine is a key issue due to its limited availability. Water is used from own sources for domestic, industrial, and agricultural purposes. Moreover, water is consumed in its virtual form through consumption of imported goods, such as crops and livestock, the production of which used water in the country of production. In addition, wastewater in many parts of the West Bank is disposed off without treatment into the wadis, deteriorating the quality of the water resources in the area and, therefore, further reducing the quantity of good quality water available. This paper calculates the water footprint for the West Bank. The consumption component of the water footprint of the West Bank was found to be 2,791 million m3 ⁄ year. Approximately 52% of this is virtual water consumed through imported goods. The West Bank per capita consumption component of the water footprint was found to be 1,116 m3 ⁄ cap ⁄ year, while the global average is 1,243 m3 ⁄ cap ⁄- year. Out of this number 50 m3 ⁄ cap ⁄ year was withdrawn from water resources available in the area. Only 16 m3 ⁄ cap ⁄ year (1.4%) was used for domestic purposes. This number is extremely low and only 28% of the global average and 21% of the Israeli domestic water use. The contamination component of the water footprint was not quantified but was believed to be many times larger than the consumption component. According to the official definition of water scarcity, the West Bank is suffering from a severe water scarcity. Therefore, there is a need for a completely new approach towards water management in the West Bank, whereby return flows are viewed as a resource and that is geared towards a conservation oriented approach of ‘‘use, treat, and reuse.’’
Water rights - West Bank
Water supply - West Bank
Water conservation - West Bank
Description: SIEBEL,maarten: van der Zaag,PIETER: nase,dima: gijzen,Huub:
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11889/2632
Appears in Collections:Fulltext Publications

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